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1

Constructor Richmond Pearson Hobson
1870-1937



Richmond Pearson Hobson was one of the great heros of the Spanish-American War, following only Theodore Roosevelt and George Dewey. Hobson's fame and
popularity was the result of leading an unsuccessful attempt to block the harbor of Santiago de Cuba by sinking the collier MERRIMAC in the entrance.

Hobson was born August 17, 1870, in Greensboro, Alabama. His father was a Confederate veteran of the American Civil War, and the family lived on the family
estate of Hobson's mother, a plantation called "Magnolia Grove". He was the second of seven children. Young Richmond attended private school, and the Southern
University in Greensboro from 1882 to 1885. He won a competitive test for appointment to the Naval Academy at age fourteen.

At Annapolis, Richmond was the youngest in his class. His strong religious views created difficulties for him with classmates. Midshipman Hobson was later put in
"coventry", or cut off from all social contact with his classmates, for putting some of the other students on report. He spent his last two years in this state of isolation.
However bad his social situation, his academic life flourished. During his years at the Academy Hobson never ranked lower than third in his class. He also developed
an interest in steam engines and naval architecture.

Hobson graduated from Annapolis in 1889, ranked first in his class. He was offered the opportunity to study naval architecture abroad and did so, in Paris at the
Ecole National Superieurdes Mines in 1890 and 1891. This was followed by studies at the Ecole d' Application du Genie Maritime from 1891 to 1893, where he
graduated "with distinction."

After his return to the United States, Hobson served for a year and a half as an assistant naval constructor in the Navy Department's Bureau of Construction and
Repair at Washington D.C. He attempted to get a posting to Asia during the Sino-Japanese War, and also to Europe, but his requests were denied. Instead, Hobson
was sent aboard the USS NEW YORK, and served in various shipyards in the northeast. During this time, a superior officer accused Hobson of neglect of duty for
accepting some defective metal castings. He was eventually vindicated by Acting Secretary of the Navy, Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1897, Hobson created and ran the third year program for naval construction at Annapolis. As war loomed, the entire class went to Key West, Florida to continue
the students' education with the North Atlantic Squadron. It was while serving with Admiral Sampson on the USS NEW YORK that Hobson was given the task of
sinking the MERRIMAC to block the entrance to Santiago Harbor. The effort failed and Hobson was taken prisoner. He was exchanged on July 6, 1898, and, to
his surprise, found himself a national hero.

After the war, Hobson had himself appointed Inspector of Spanish Wrecks, charged with determining if any of the damaged and sunken Spanish vessels at Cuba
could be raised and reused. He succeeded in raising the REINA MERCEDES and the INFANTA MARIA TERESA. Hobson next went to the Far East to continue
his salvage efforts with the victims of Dewey's attack. Here he salvaged the ISLE DE CUBA, ISLE DE LUZON and DON JUAN DE AUSTRIA. On his way to
the Philippines, Hobson, still the popular war hero, was accused of kissing his way across the United States as he accepted the requests of ladies to be kissed. When
the press began making an issue of it an embarrassed Hobson refused all future requests. Hobson's hero status also created tension with his fellow officers, many of
whom avoided him. About this time, he began to suffer from inflammation of the retina, which was aggravated by exposure to sunlight and desk work. Hobson
requested a medical discharge beginning in 1900. The request was denied.

In 1901 Congress passed a joint resolution thanking Hobson for his exploits aboard the MERRIMAC. The resolution promoted him from Lieutenant to Captain, and
also advanced him ten positions on the Construction Corps seniority list. This action served to make Hobson even more of an outcast among his fellow officers, who
resented the preferential treatment. He resigned his commission in 1903.

Hobson's departure from the Navy gave him time for other pursuits also. In 1905 he married Grizelda Houston Hull, the great-great niece of Confederate general
Leonidas Polk, the great niece of former Alabama governor, George Houston, and a cousin of General "Fightin' Joe" Wheeler. These connections would serve him
well in political life.

As a civilian, Hobson took up the lecture circuit, traveling across the country in 1903 and 1904. In 1907, on his second attempt, the former Captain was elected to
Congress, serving four terms. In 1908, before an unfriendly Democratic National Convention, Hobson commented that President Theodore Roosevelt had stated
that there was a good possibility of war with Japan in the near future. Roosevelt denied the comments. With his Great White Fleet preparing to sail around the world,
talk of trouble with Japan, either military or diplomatic, was not appreciated by the President. In spite of the acrimonious debate, Hobson continued predicting war
with Japan until even the press tired of reporting his comments on the issue.

Congressman Hobson served on the Naval Affairs Committee from 1907 to 1914, working to strengthen the fleet and warning of future clashes with European
powers, Japan and Russia. He was an early supporter of Womens' Suffrage and fought for Black soldiers unjustly accused of rioting and killing a civilian in
Brownsville Texas. In 1911, he introduced the first National Prohibition bill. Hobson's views, unpopular with many of his constituents, ended his political career in
1916.

Later in life, Hobson continued to act against alcohol and drug abuse, serving as general secretary of the American Alcohol and Education Association, president of
the International Narcotic Education Association and the World Narcotic Defense Association. He was also the organizer of the 1926 World Conference on
Narcotic Education.

In 1933, Hobson was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions aboard the MERRIMAC during the Spanish-American War. His crew had
received the medal in 1899, but officers were not eligible for the honor at that time. In 1934, Hobson was made a Rear Admiral on the retired list and granted a
pension.

Richmond Pearson Hobson died of a heart attack on March 16, 1937, and was buried with honors in Arlington National Cemetery.



The above information was condensed from Richard Turk's introduction to: Hobson, Richmond, Pearson, "The Sinking of the Merrimac", Annapolis: Naval Institute
Press, 1987, ISBN 0-87021-632-5.

Richmond Pearson Hobson
Rear Admiral, United States Navy

Born at Greensboro, Hale County, Alabama, August 17, 1870, he graduated from the United States Naval
Academy in 1885. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1933 for sinking the collier Merrimac in Havana Harbor in
1898 during the Spanish-American War.

He was made a Rear Admiral by an Act of Congress in 1934 and was the founder and president of Constitution
Democracy Association in 1935. He also served briefly as a Member of Congress from Alabama.

He died in New York City on March 16, 1937 and was buried in Section 6 of Arlington National Cemetery.

Courtesy of the U.S. House of Representatives:

Representative from Alabama; born in Greensboro, Hale County, Ala., August 17, 1870; attended private schools
and Southern University; was graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1889 and from the French
National School of Naval Design at Paris in 1893; served in the United States Navy from 1885 until 1903; special
representative of the Navy Department to the Buffalo Exposition in 1901 and to the Charleston Exposition in 1901
and 1902; naval architect, author, and lecturer; elected as a Democrat to the Sixtieth and to the three succeeding
Congresses (March 4, 1907-March 3, 1915); unsuccessful candidate for nomination in 1916 to the Sixty-fifth
Congress; moved to Los Angeles, Calif., and later to New York City; organized the American Alcohol Education
Association in 1921 and served as general secretary;
organized the International Narcotic Education Association in 1923 and served as president; organized the World
Conference on Narcotic Education in 1926 and served as secretary general and as chairman of the board of
governors; founder of the World Narcotic Defense Association in 1927, serving as president; awarded the
Congressional Medal of Honor in 1933 for sinking the collier Merrimac in 1898; was made a rear admiral by act of
Congress in 1934; founder and president of the Constitutional Democracy Association in 1935; died in New York
City March 16, 1937; interment in Arlington National Cemetery.  
Hobson, Richmond Pearson Sr. (I1407)
 
2 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Rebecca Jean (I0117)
 
3

The following is a letter from Fannie Houston dated Nov. 1898 addressed to Mr. J. C. Houston, Phenix, AL

The letter is old and obviously handwritten and not very clear, and I've done the best I can at reading it and copying it here. I have copied the capital letters, spelling, etc, exactly as handwritten.

Postmarked Nov 12, 1898 ELMVIEW, TEX. on the front. On the back, postmarked HOWE, TEX NOV 12, 1898 REC'D.

Mr. J. C. Houston, Phenix, Ala Elm View Tex. Nov 1898

Dear Pap and Family,

I guess you think I'm not going to write to you anymore. You will please forgive me for waiting so long to write. We are enjoying the best of health. hope this will find you all enjoying the same. Willie is most done gathering we have had a nice fall for gathering. it has not raind any here to amount to anything since July. Cotton is not hardly worth picking it is selling at 3 @ 4 cts. Corn is going up a little. Willie sold 100 bushels at 20 cts. per bushel. papa I have got part of my money at last and I guess I'll get the balance sometime soon. You said I seem to think that you was the caus of me not getting it Oh, No I did not think that. I did think it was the hardest mater to get any hereing from I had gave it up and I thought I would never get it. papa did Lizzie ever pay the money back that she borrowed from you. I think you could have put that money to a better use than to send it here to Murry to spend cureing his old (?-see note below) for I know that is the way it went him and Lizzie done so bad that thay sold ever thing they had and left here in August and said thay was going back to Ala. so I don't know where thay are and dont care. Jhonnie why dont you and Oliver write to me I would be so glad to just get one word from you. well I will close write real soon. Your love, Fannie 
Houston, Fannie Mae (I0035)
 
4
George Smith Houston

1874-1876
1876-1878

George Smith Houston was born on January 17, 1811, in Williamson County,
Tennessee, the son of David and Hannah Pugh (Reagan) Houston. Natives of South
Carolina, the family moved to Tennessee and in ca. 1821 moved to Lauderdale
County, Alabama, where they became farmers. George was the grandson of John and
Mary (Ross) Houston, who emigrated from County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1760.

Houston was educated in the Lauderdale County Academy, read law in the office
of Judge George Coalter in Florence, and completed his studies in Judge Boyle's
law school in Harrodsburg, KY. He was admitted to the bar in 1831, was elected
to the state legislature from Lauderdale County in 1832, and was appointed
district solicitor by Governor Gayle in 1834. In 1837 he was elected as a
solicitor and held the office until 1841. In 1841 he was elected to the US
House of Representatives, a position to which he was reelected eight times,
retiring for only two years in 1849. He retired again in 1861, resigning when
Alabama seceded.

Houston was consistently opposed to secession and ran as a Unionist candidate
for Congress in 1850. He advocated and became a member of the committee of
thirty-three to devise a means to save the union, but when Alabama seceded, he
drafted and presented to the speaker the formal withdrawal of the Alabama
delegation from the US Congress. Houston sympathized with the Confederacy and
contributed to its support.

Houston was elected to the US Senate in 1865, but Alabama was denied
representation. Houston resumed his law practice in Athens, Alabama. In 1874,
Houston defeated the radical incumbent David Lewis and became governor of the
state. Houston was an immensely popular man who became known as the "Bald
Eagle of the Mountains." The conservative Democrats won by a large majority
during the 1874 gubernatorial election, bringing about the victory of the
"White Supremacy" in Alabama. This election was known for its intimidation at
the polls to discourage the Republican vote. Houston, known as the Redeemer
governor of Alabama, won his office with the slogans of "White Supremacy" and
"home rule."

Aside from being a lawyer, Houston also had industrial interests. Before
Houston became governor, he was a close associate of James W. Sloss, one of the
leaders in the industrialization of north Alabama. Houston served as director
of one of the affiliated lines of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Loss,
who associated with the Alabama Democratic-Conservative Party, and William D.
(Pig-Iron) Kelley (Alabama and Chattanooga Railroad), who associated with the
Republican Party, both vied for the mineral resources in north Alabama.
Alabama was eager to fund the railroads, which brought the state to the brink
of bankruptcy. Financing of the railroad systems accounted for $17,000,000 of
the total estimated $25,000,000 debt incurred by the state after the Civil War.

As governor, Houston advocated a policy which converted the penitentiary into a
source of state revenue and urged economy in every department of state. The
most important measure before the legislature during his administration was the
state debt. The greatest challenge, according to Stewart, was deciding which
debts were valid and which were fraudulent. A committee was appointed to
investigate and adjust the debt. The debt commission consisted of Governor
Houston, who served as ex-officio chairman, Tristram B. Bethea and Levi W.
Lawler. The commission recommended that the state turn over to the creditors
first mortgages on the railroads which gad defaulted on interest payments. New
bonds were issued at a lower rate of interest to substitute for the old
carpetbag bonds. The commission's report was adopted and $8,596,000 in bonds
were issued by the state. (Stewart, p. 126) "Since the debt was always a
potential debt and would have become an actual debt only by the state's
becoming the owner of the railroads endorsed, the debt settlement' took the
form of relieving the state of its potential debt and the railroads of the
threat of foreclosure on mortgages held by the state." (Woodward, p. 10)
Residual obligations were therefore reduced to $12,000,000. Alabama staggered
under the interest payments on the old Reconstruction debt for another twenty
years, resulting in the poor and slow development of such public services as
education.

Also during Houston's two-term administration, the Alabama Constitutional
Convention of 1875 was held. The new constitution was marked by the outlawing
of loans by state, county, or municipal governments to private business and by
prohibiting the building of railroads by the state government. The
constitution became effective in December 1875. "The four main points of the
new constitution, followed assiduously by Governor Houston's administration,
were economy, education, payment or abrogation of old Reconstruction debts, and
a complete reversal of the practices of Reconstruction." (Stewart, p. 126)

Houston was reelected governor in 1876. At the expiration of that term in
1878, he was elected to the US Senate. He served in the extra session of 1879,
but did not return to Washington, DC due to ill health. He died in 1879 at his
home in Athens.

It was the Redeemers who laid the lasting foundations in matters of race,
politics, economics, and law for the modern South. Houston's administrations
reorganized the public school system and established the Alabama State Board of
Health, the first public health department in the South. Cullman County was
also created. Stewart states that by the end of Houston's second term, he
managed to reduce taxes and bring state expenditures under control.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Authorities:
Owen, Thomas M. History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, 1921.
Stewart, John Craig. The Governors of Alabama, 1975.
Woodward, C. Vann. Origins of the New South, 1877-1913, 1971.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Return to Alabama History On-Line
Return to Alabama Governors On-Line

http://www.asc.edu/archives/govs_list/g_housto.html
Revised: 7/7/95


= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = OTHER INFORMATION= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

George Smith Houston, born 17 Jan 1811 in Williamson Co., TN;
died 31 Dec 1879 in Athens, AL; married (1) Mary I. Beatty 1835;
born in OH; died Bef. 1861; married (2) Ellen Irvine Apr 1861 in
Lauderdale Co., AL; born Abt. 1836 in Florence, AL.


Notes for George Smith Houston:
Governor of Alabama and Senator after the Civil War.
1832 Ala State Legislator
1841 US Representative
1861 resigned Congress, opposed to secession
1865 elected US Senate, not seated
1876 elected Governor (Democrat) of Alabama
1878 elected US Senate

From: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress -
1999 : http://bioguide.congress.gov

HOUSTON, George Smith, a Representative and a Senator from
Alabama; born near Franklin, Williamson County, Tenn., January
17, 1811; moved with his parents to Lauderdale County, Ala., and
attended an academy there; studied law in Florence, Ala., and
Harrodsburg, Ky.; was admitted to the bar in 1831; commenced
practice in Florence, Ala.; member, State house of
representatives 1832; settled in Athens, Ala., in 1835; State?s
attorney for the Florence judicial district in 1836; elected as a
Democrat to the Twenty-seventh and to the three succeeding
Congresses (March 4, 1841-March 3, 1849); declined to be a
candidate for renomination in 1848; elected to the Thirty-second
and to the four succeeding Congresses and served from March
4, 1851, until January 21, 1861, when he withdrew; chairman,
Committee on Ways and Means (Thirty-second and Thirty-third
Congresses), Committee on Judiciary (Thirty-fifth Congress);
presented credentials as a Senator-elect to the United States
Senate on February 9, 1866, for the term ending March 3, 1867,
but was not permitted to take his seat; Governor of Alabama
1874-1878; elected to the United States Senate and served from
March 4, 1879, until his death in Athens, Ala., December 31,
1879; interment in Athens City Cemetery.

Bibliography: DAB; Draughon, Ralph. ?George Smith Houston
and Southern Unity, 1846-1849.? Alabama Review 19 (July
1966): 187-207; U.S. Congress. Memorial Addresses. 46th
Cong., 2nd sess., 1879-1880. Washington, D.C.: Government
Printing Office, 1880.


 
Houston, George Smith (I0606)
 
5
Possible name spelling is Chung-Ji, or Chong-Chi 
Chung-Ji (I0115)
 
6
Served in U.S. Army in Germany, Vietnam, and later stationed in Korea.
In Vietnam, was a helicopter mechanic. David had a keen mind for repairing small engines and
mechanical things. Before his death from a brain hemorrhage in 1993, he did additions and remodeling to homes in the Birmingham area. 
Moore, David Houston (I0014)
 
7
Notes for James Houston
He was a judge; mayor of Brunswick, GA for three terms, 1856, 1857, 1870. At time of death he was city clerk and treasurer.

MILITARY: THE WATERS & KINDRED FAMILIES by Philemon Berry Waters, 1902, p. 160: In Civil War he was quartermaster of Benning's Brigade with rank of captain and served entire four years of war.

Moved from South Carolina to Brunswick, Ga in 1852.
 
Houston, James E. (I1243)
 
8 Reiley Moore had settled in Orange County, Virginia (Shenandoah Valley) by 26 January 1735/36 when Morgan Morgan and Peter Woolf listed the settlements within the McKay, Hite, and Duff and Green 1000,00-acre Colony of Virginia grant land. 144 Before 24 September 1742, he had attended the Orange County Court for eight days, testifying for William Linvell against Nathaniel Chapman. 145
Stephen Ruddle sold 175 acres on the west side of the North River Shenandoah to Reiley Moore for which Moore received a Fairfax grant on 15 August 1749. 146 This tract was located between Benjamin Allen?s 400-acre tract and William White?s 400-acre 29 June 1739 patent land. (between Tract 157 and Tract 158, Map 15) U. S. Highway 11 crosses the west section of the tract at South Jackson.
Reiley Moore was deceased by 1 July 1760 when his will (dated 15 February 1760) was proved in Frederick County Court. He willed one-half of his plantation and the moveable estate to his wife Sarah. After Sarah?s death, her half of the 175 acres would devolve to their son James Moore. He bequeathed the other half of the 175 acres to son Reuben Moore. He mentioned ?other children? but did not name them. Witnesses to the will were Evan Jones,
Amos Lewis and Susan Lewis. 147
Reiley Moore?s father was William Moore (b. 1676 c.), a carpenter by trade and a member of the Established (Episcopal) Church. He married about 1699 Rachel --, Prince George?s County, Md. William and Rachel Moore had seven children: (1) Ann Moore b. 12 July 1700; (2) Riley Moore b. 8 February 1702, and twin of (3) John Moore; (4) Samuel Moore b. 15 February 1704; (5) William Moore, Jr. b. 10 April 1707; (6) Rachel Moore b. 18 May 1710; and (7) George Moore b. 16 September 1712. These dates of birth are from St. Barnabas Church, Queen Anne?s Parish, Prince George?s Co, Md. 1689-1777, Births and Christenings.
Riley Moore, the twin, b. 8 Feb. 1702, Prince George?s Co., Md. m. Sarah Holland 16 Aug. 1726 at St. Barnabas Church, Queen Anne?s Parish (Marriage Records 1711-1711). Riley and Sarah (Holland) Moore had seven known children.


Notes for Riley Moore:
"A History of Shenandoah Co., VA" by Wayland Riley MOORE came to the Shen. Valley from theMonocacy Valley, MD 1734 and took up land near Mt. Jackson. (pg 49)Page 53- same source: At least 2 families of Moores have been prominent Shen.: the dec. of Riley MOORE and those of Joseph MOORE,
early settler of "MOORE's Store".Kercheval's days (another author of another book), Aaron MOORE, a
grandson of Riley was still living. My other source is "Allens: Quakers of Shenandoah, by Rudelle Mills Davis and Peggy Davidson Dick, published about 1984.Since the Allen and MOORE families intermarried, they included a section on the MOORE Family: excerpts:
Riley MOORE (1702-1760_ from St. John's Parish, PG co., Md, accompanied by Benj. Allen and Wm. White, arrived at the present day Mt. Jackson, Shen. Co, VA by 1734. The date of the their arrival is estab. by the fact that Riley's neighbo r, Benj. Allen, received a patent for 2 tracts of land on Mill Creek, the 1st being 170 acres surveyed by Kames Wood on 26 Feb and a 2nd adj. tract of 120 acres, surveyed by Wood for Allen 2 Mar The earliest rec. of Riley MOORE's ancestors is that of this grandmother, Mary MOORE. Mary had a son, Wm MOORE b 1676. Mary MOORE m 2nd Hugh Riley, who became Wm.
Step-father. Wm. a carpenter, married Rachel____, Prince Geo. Co, MD. Had 7 children: Ann, Riley, John, Samuel, Wm, Rachel, Geo. (from St. Barnabus Church, Queen Anne's parish, PG co., MA. According
to the authors, Riley married Sarah Holland 16 Aug, 1726 at St. Barnabus. They moved to the Shen. Valley about 1734. Children: William 1727 (Md) Dorcas 1731 Thomas 1732 Jacob 1734John Reuben 1740 James (Dr.) d.1771 Reuben and James names came form Riley's will others from "This Heritage" Eisenberg, Harrisburg PA- bapt. rec. of Rev John Casper Stover. Riley died1760. His will (Fred. Co. Will Bk. 2, pg 405) names wife Sarah and 2 youngest sons. It is not known if Thomas MOORE, of the valley, the Quaker who married Mary Allen was kin to Riley MOORE. Many think he is, but others show that Riley's son Thomas b. 1732 was not old enough to be Surety of Reuben Allen II's bond for adm. of his father's estate 1741, and for uncle Benj. Allen's estate 1746.
More About Riley Moore and Sarah Holland:
Marriage: August 16, 1726, Maryland.
Children of Riley Moore and Sarah Holland are:
+Jacob Moore, b. December 1734, Maryland, d. Abt. 1801, Shenandoah, Virginia.


Riley MOORE1
----------------------------------------
Birth: 8 Feb 1701 Queen Ann Parish, Prince George County,
Maryland "Monocacy Valley"
Death: 1 Jul 1760 Will: 15 Feb 1760 Probated; 1 Jul 1760 in
Frederick County, Virginia1
Father: William MOORE (1676-)
Mother: Rachel RILEY
Spouses:
----------------------------------------
1: Sarah HOLLAND1,2
Birth: 17 Oct 1708 Anne Arundel County, Maryland
Death: aft 1740
Father: John HOLLAND (1675-1718)
Mother: Anne SPICER (1680-1711)
Marriage: 16 Aug 1726 Queen Ann Parish, Prince George County,
Maryland2
Children: William (Twin) (1727-)
John (Twin) (1727-)
James (1729-1801)
Reuben (1731-)
Thomas (1733-1797)
Notes for Riley MOORE
1"Frederick County, Virginia Will Book No. 2"
Page 405
Riley MOORE
Will: 15 Feb 1760
Probated: 1 Jul 1760
Named as his wife: Sarah to have half of the plantation with its orchards,
and movable estate.
Named as his son: Reuben to have his wife's half after death.
Named as his son: James to have the other half of the estate.
Signed by Riley MOORE
Witnesses: Evan JONES, Amos LEWIS and Susanna LEWIS
Received by Arch. WAGER, CC
"Frederick County, Virginia Will Book No. 3"
Page 5
Reiley MOORE
Inventory: 8 Oct 1760, 1 Dec 1761
Value of estate not given, items not totaled for books, household items
and furniture and stock.
Report taken by John RUDDELL, Cornelius RUDDELL and William WHITE.
Received by Arch. WAGER, CC
Misc. Notes
PIONEERS OF OLD FREDERICK COUNTY VIRGINIA by Cecil O'Dell p 482
"Reiley Moore had settled in Orange County,Virginia (Shenandoah Valley)
by 26 January 1735/36 when Morgan Morgan and Peter Woolf listed the
settlements within the McKay, Hite, Duff and Green 100,000-acre Colony
of Virginia grant land. #144 Before 24 September 1742, he had
attended the Orange County Court for eight days, testifying for William
Linvell against Nathaniel Chapman. #145
Stephen Ruddle sold 175 acres on the west side of the North River
Shenandoah to Reiley Moore for which Moore received a Fairfax grant on
15 August 1749. #146 This tract was located between Benjamin Allen's
400-acre tract and William White's 400-acre 29 June 1739 patent land.
(between Tract 157 and 158, Map 15) U.S. Highway 11 crosses the west
section of the tract at South Jackson.
Reiley Moore's father was William Moore (v. 1676 c.), "a carpenter by
trade and a member of the Established (Episcopal) Church. He married
about 1699 Rachel--, Prince George's County, MD. Wiliam and Rachel
Moore had seven children:......these dates of birth are from St Barnabas
Church, Queen Anne's Parish, Prince George's Co., MD 1689. Births and
Christenings.
#144-Hite/Fairfax lawsuit, Brithish Copy, p. 262
#145-Orange Co VA Court Book 3, p. 240
#146-Gray, Northern Neck Grants, G-272
Sources
1. ?Abstracts of Frederick County, VA Wills, Inventories & Accounts,?
1743-1816; 1816-1837, Volume Number 1; 1743-1816, Volume Number 2; 1816-1837,
Abstracted and Compiled By Dee Ann Buck, Dee Ann Buck, 10814 Paynes
Church Drive, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 )703) 591-2593/passthebuck48@Hotmail.com,
2004.
2. ?Charles County, Maryland 1658-1758; "The First 100 Years"; Wills,
Court, Church, Land, Inventories & Accounts,? Includes early Northern Neck Virg
inia records for counties bordering the Rappahannock and Potomac Rivers,
Marshall Hall/mrmarsha2004@yahoo.com, http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com, Last
update: 17 Oct 2009. 
Moore, Reiley (I9265)
 
9 "United States Census, 1850," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MH54-SP4 : accessed 24 September 2015), William Moore, Shelby county, Shelby, Alabama, United States; citing family 47, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).


Parents of William Henry Moore (our Great-great Grandfather):
William Moore (our Great-great-great Grandfather), b 1764, Prince George's County, MD; d 9-7-1842, AL
Buried in Moore's Cemetery, Shelby County, Alabama
Mary, b 1773; d 4-30-1846, AL
Buried in Moore's Cemetery, Shelby County, Alabama
Children:
Artenissa, Mary Elizabeth, Aaron, and William Henry 
Moore, William Henry (I9240)
 
10 1870 GA. Census Records indicate a David Houston, age 50, living in Haralson County, GA. Houston, David R. (I0684)
 
11 1870 GA. Census Records indicate a John Houston, age 54, living in Haralson County, Ga. Houston, John (I1064)
 
12 1870 Ga. Census Records, Troup County, show a HUGH HOUSTON, age 28, indicating born about 1842. Could this be the same Hugh Houston? Houston, Hugh W. (I2440)
 
13 1880 U.S. Census shows her at age 15, living with parents.
Census taken at Daviston, Talapoosa, Alabama 
Robertson, Martha Mildred Exer (I0019)
 
14 ?thelwulf (Old English for "Noble Wolf") was King of Wessex from 839 to 858. In 825 his father, King Egbert, defeated King Beornwulf of Mercia, ending a long Mercian dominance over Anglo-Saxon England south of the Humber. Egbert sent ?thelwulf with an army to Kent, where he expelled the Mercian sub-king and was appointed sub-king. After 830 Egbert maintained good relations with Mercia, and this was continued by ?thelwulf when he became king in 839, the first son to succeed his father as West Saxon king since 641.

The Vikings were not a major threat to Wessex during ?thelwulf's reign. In 843 he was defeated in a battle against the Vikings at Carhampton in Somerset, but achieved a major victory at the Battle of Aclea in 851. In 853 he joined a successful Mercian expedition to Wales to restore the traditional Mercian hegemony, and in the same year his daughter ?thelswith married King Burgred of Mercia. In 855 ?thelwulf went on pilgrimage to Rome. In preparation he gave a "decimation", donating a tenth of his personal property to his subjects; he appointed his eldest surviving son ?thelbald to act as King of Wessex in his absence, and his next son ?thelberht to rule Kent and the south-east. ?thelwulf spent a year in Rome, and on his way back he married Judith, the daughter of the West Frankish King Charles the Bald.

When ?thelwulf returned to England, ?thelbald refused to surrender the West Saxon throne, and ?thelwulf agreed to divide the kingdom, taking the east and leaving the west in ?thelbald's hands. On ?thelwulf's death in 858 he left Wessex to ?thelbald and Kent to ?thelberht, but ?thelbald's death only two years later led to the re-unification of the kingdom.

In the twentieth century ?thelwulf's reputation among historians was poor: he was seen as excessively pious and impractical, and his pilgrimage was viewed as a desertion of his duties. Historians in the twenty-first century see him very differently, as a king who consolidated and extended the power of his dynasty, commanded respect on the continent, and dealt more effectively than most of his contemporaries with Viking attacks. He is regarded as one of the most successful West Saxon kings, who laid the foundations for the success of his son, Alfred the Great.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%86thelwulf

**************************************************************************
?thelwulf, King of England from 839 to 856
Born about 800
Died on January 13, 858 and interred at Winchester Cathedral, England
?thelwulf reigned from 839 to 856 at which point he abdicated in favour of his son ?thelbald after returning from a lengthy pilgrimmage. He was Under-king of Kent 825 - 839 and 856 - 858. Renown for his military prowess, he reputedly defeated 350 viking ships. He reduced taxation, endowed the Church, made lay lands inheritable, and provided systems of poor relief.

?thelwulf married first circa 830 to Osburga, daughter of Oslac, Thane of Isle of Wight and "Pincerna Regis" or Grand Butler of England; called a descendant of Wihtgar, a nephew of Cerdic who ruled the Isle of Wight in the 6th century. ?thelwulf and Osburga had the following children:

?thelbald, born about 834, King of England 856 - 860, who was married for a short period in 860 to his late father's second wife, Princess Judith, daughter of Charles II the Bald, King of the West Franks; i.e., he married his stepmother after his father died. People of the time seem to have taken a dim view of this marriage. Asser wrote in his Life of King Alfred: "Once ?thelwulf was dead, ?thelbald, his son, agains God's prohibition and Christian dignity . . . took over his father's marriage bed and married Judith . . . incurring great disgrace from all who heard of it . . .."
?thelbert, born about 836, King of England 860 - 866.
?thelred I, born circa 840, King of England 866 - 871, his son:
?thelhelm, Ealdorman of Wiltshire, circa 859 - 898, his daughter:
?lfl?da who married Edward the Elder, King of England 899 - 924.
Alfred the Great
?thelswyth, who married to Burghred King of Mercia and became a nun on widowhood. She died on a pilgrimage to Rome and is buried at either Pavia or Ticino in Italy.
?thelwulf married second on October 1, 856 at Verberie sur Oise, France to Princess Judith, daughter of Charles II "the Bald", King of the West Franks. Judith was only about 13 years old at the time, and the marriage was really nothing more than a demonstration of alliance between ?thelwulf and Charles "the Bald". Click on Princess Judith for her descent.
 
Wessex, Aethelwulf of (I9402)
 
15 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Harris, Jerry Grant (I0542)
 
16 About the name George Francis Williams.....this explains why her name is "George".....

I received this note on November 9, 2011.....

Dean,



The other day I just happened to put my grandmother's name in the computer and found your webpage which I passed to my sister.

We think that is just wonderful I can't imagine how long it took for you to find all that information. I am writing you just to fill you in on

some information I found and was told over the years. My great grandmother's name was George F. (Williams) Houston, very weird

I know but I was told her mother and father wanted a boy and went on to name her George. I hope you do not mind but I have included

information I know and some links if you want to investigate yourself further. Again that is a VERY VERY WONDERFUL job you have

done and I just wanted to let you know.



Thank you,

June (Goins) Martin

Margaret Hancock's Daughter 
Williams, George Francis (I2853)
 
17 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Clarence Wayne (I0011)
 
18 Adopted. Houston, James (I0150)
 
19 After marriage in Georgia, they migrated to Blount and Cullman County, AL Houston, Emily Catherine (I0708)
 
20 Alfred the Great (849 ? 26 October 899) (Old English: ?lfred, ?lfr?d, "elf counsel" or "wise elf") was King of Wessex from 871 to 899.

Alfred successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and by the time of his death had become the dominant ruler in England. He is one of only two English monarchs to be given the epithet "the Great", the other one being Cnut the Great (although Cnut was not Saxon, but Danish). He was also the first King of the West Saxons to style himself "King of the Anglo-Saxons". Details of Alfred's life are described in a work by the 10th-century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser. A devout Christian, Alfred had a reputation as a learned and merciful man of a gracious and level-headed nature who encouraged education and improved his kingdom's legal system, military structure and his people's quality of life.

Alfred the Great, King of England from 871 to his death in 899
Born in 849 at Wantage, Berkshire
Died on October 28, 899 and interred at Hyde Abbey, Winchester
Alfred prevented the Danish conquest of England, defeating them at Edington in 878 after a campaign of guerrila warfare. After his victory he allowed the Danes to keep their conquests in Mercia and East Anglia provided that Guthrum, their king, was converted to Christianity. Alfred built a navy of Warships to defend the south coast against further Danish invasions (885 - 886; 892 - 896) and protected Wessex with a chain of fortifications. He took London in 886, thereby gaining control of all England except the Danish areas.

Alfred married in 868 to Ealhswith, a Mercian noblewoman, daughter of ?thelred Mucil "the Great", Ealdorman of the Gainas and his wife Eadburgh of the Royal House of Mercia. This marriage revived the ties between Sessex and Mercia; and provided Alfred with a powerful ally north of the Thames.
Alfred and Ealhswith had the following children:

?thelfl?d (869 - 919) who married ?thelred II Ealdorman of Mercia.
Edmund, born about 870, died young.
Edward the Elder, King of England, born 869
?fthryth who married Baldwin II "the Bald", Count of Flanders. Click on Baldwin the Bald. Their greatX4 granddaughter was Mathilda of Flanders who married William the Conqueror.
?thelgeofu, Abbess of Shaftesbury
?thelweard (880 - 922) 
Great, Alfred the King of all England (I9400)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Ponder, Jo Carolyn (I0540)
 
22 Also known as Fannie.

1880 Census records Coweta Co, GA......

In 1880, in Coweta County, Georgia, Joshua Moore, age 80, born in North Carolina, both parents born in Virginia, was a farmer. His wife Elizabeth, age 60, had been born in Georgia, her father in South Carolina, her mother in Georgia. With them lived their daughter Susan, age 30, single, and Samuel James, age 20, their grandson.

Next door, 62-year-old Martha Houston, mother of Emma C. Moore, lived alone.

Next door to Martha lived Henry and Barbara A. Moore and their thirteen children. In 1880 Native Americans were sometimes shown as "black" and we are not sure of this family's race or relationship to the Joshua Moore family.

Next door to them lived Joshua's son, William J. Moore, age 37, a farmer, born in Georgia, both parents in Georgia (?), and his wife Enna or Emma, age 33, born in Georgia and children: Martha Y., age 13, Mary E., age 11, Oliver J., age 9, Willie E., age 6, Ennina C. (Emma), age 4, and Celanna (Salemma), age 2. Ennina C. was listed as male.

In the next residence lived Newton B. Houston, Emma's brother who later married William J.'s sister Susan Moore. 
Moore, Emma Centennial Tinney (I8095)
 
23 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Everett, Ethel Margaret (I0762)
 
24 Apparently was adopted by her mother's second Husband, Henry John Boyer.

Shirley Patricia Boyer Bell, 71, of Hamilton Parkway, wife of the late Wayne Lee Bell, Sr., passed away Monday, April 7, 2014 at Greenville Memorial Hospital.

Born July 4, 1942 in Plantersville, Alabama, she was the adopted daughter of the late Henry John and Mae Frances Fulford Boyer. Mrs. Bell was a homemaker who was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.

She is survived by her sons, Wayne Bell, Jr. (Robin), John Bell (Vicki); daughter, Kimberly Harriss (Robb); brother, Karl Boyer; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 
Harris, Shirley Patricia (I9228)
 
25 Arm was blown off while using dynamite to catch fish. Richards, Douglas (I5867)
 
26 Attorney in year 2000 at Fernando Beach, (Amblia(?) Island) Chittum, Randy (I4667)
 
27 Aunt Sophies left leg required amputation at age nine due to blood poisoning after she stepped on a nail.
She died on the 9th of September, 1980 from complications of diabetes and is buried in Liberty Cemetery. 
Stuckey, Sophia (I8584)
 
28 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Josie Deanna (I5847)
 
29 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Houston, Stafford Keith (I0378)
 
30 Bipolar Houston, Joseph Leighton (I0389)
 
31 Birth: Feb. 16, 1877
Death: May 18, 1960

Marriage Certificate - Talladega County, AL, signed by Judge of Probate 5 August 1899
Pansie McDougal, T. M. Moore
Signed by V. O. Hawkins, Minister, on 6 August 1899
Got married "home of the bride"


Burial:
Stewartville Cemetery
Coosa County
Alabama, USA

Created by: Richard Robinson
Record added: Jul 23, 2005
Find A Grave Memorial# 11412194

In 1880 Census, living in Marble Valley, Coosa County, Alabama, age 3.
 
McDougal, Pansie Savannah (I0121)
 
32 Blacksmith. Owned and operated a two-forge blacksmith shop.
Father born in Tennessee.
Mother born in Illinois.

Had child named "Virgie" from a previous marriage, mother was born in Missouri.
Virgie was born in October 1889. 
Barlow, William Walker Berry (I0050)
 
33 Born about AD 10 but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years.
 
Hermodsson, Scyld Sefing (I9464)
 
34 Born about AD 30 but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years. Scyldwasson, Beaw (I9462)
 
35 Born about AD 50 but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years.
 
Asgard, Taetwa Beawsson of (I9460)
 
36 Born about AD 70 but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years. Taetwasson, Geata Jat (I9458)
 
37 Born about AD 90 but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years. Geatasson, Godwulf (I9456)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Clark, Aurora Estellize (I9371)
 
39 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Austin Ted (I9017)
 
40 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Moore, Alexandria Grace (I8192)
 
41 Born Before 10 BC but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years. Itermonsson, Hermod (I9466)
 
42 Born before 30 BC but Family Tree Maker doesn't allow entry of 2-digit years, or dates in that format. Hathrasson, Itermon (I9468)
 
43 Born in Ireland in 1760 where his ancestors had fled from Scotland to escape persecution for their loyalty to Prince Charlie. The Houstons belonged to the Scotch-Irish nobility; but, having cast in their lot with the U.S. for which the youthful John had suffered wounds and imprisonment and all hardships incident to the life of a soldier for the whole period of the Revolutionary War, he and his father refused to return to assume the ancestral title. He was badly wounded in the war and taken prisoner by the Tories. He later received a land grant in Georgia for his military services.
Soldier and patriot.

He came to America between 1760 and 1765 - this and other history of the family was found in a book of the history of Coweta County in the Newnan Library in Newnan, Georgia.


John Houston, Jr. was born April 10, 1760 in Ireland, according to
his pension records. The names of his parents were not
mentioned in the records, but descendants state they were John
and Mary Ross Houston.
He enlisted in the Revolutionary War on March 01, 1776 from
Orangeburg District, South Carolina, in place of his father, in
Captain Flood's Company. From June 01, 1776 one month in
Captain John Sally's company and from July 03, 1776 one month
in Captain Fullington's company, under Major Charles Limming.
He moved to Ninety Six District late in 1779 and served several
more tours of duty up through 1782, serving as a private. During
that time he served as follows; from Mary 05, 1779, four months in
Captain Thomas Dugan's company to range on the frontier; from
March 01, 1780, three months in Captain Dugan's
companyColonel John Purvis' regiment; from in the fall of 1780
until December 15, 1781 under Captains Thomas and James
Dugan and John Virgin, Colonels Joseph Hays and Levi Gaisey;
from March 01, 1782, three months in Captain Henry Keys'
company, under Colonel Jared Smith; from Jun e 06, 1782, four
months under Lieutenant James Stark. During his service he was
in skirmishes on broad River and was wounded at Cross Roads
between Demkins Creek and Encore Rover. Taken prisoner,
remained until Christmas, released on parole, broke parole and
re-enlisted. He was at the seige of Ninety-Six and an
engagement at Bush River.
He married in the summer of 1788, Mary Wilson. She was still
living in 1843. She was allowed pension on her application
executed November, 1835 at which time she was seventy-five
years of age. It is known that in 1836 she received $80.00 per
annum pension.
About 1801 he moved to Jasper County, Georgia, and by 1827
he is found in the tax records of Fayette County, Georgia. In 1833,
he is living in Coweta County, Georgia where by sworn statement
he made application on November 15 for his pension. He died
May 24, 1835 and his will is of record, being dated March 17,
1834 and recorded July 06, 1835, Coweta County, Georgia.


File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by:
Nancy Poquette npoq@hotmail.com July 4, 2006, 3:34 am

Pension Application Of John Houston, Natl Archives Microseries M804, Roll 1337, Application #W3817
Coweta County, GA, October 11th, 1832:
John Houston, aged 72 years-?That he entered the service in March 1776 for one month as a substitute for his father who was drafted. This company was commanded by Captain Flood and was stationed in Charleston, SC. In June 1776, I again entered the service as a substitute for one month in the place of Henry Coon. We sailed from Charleston the first of June down to Hadrell?s Point in company with the Charleston
Grenadiers, Foresters. His company was commanded by Captain John Salley. He was one
of the guard that was stationed on the Lower Bridge between the Point and Sullivan?s
Island the day of the Battle on Sullivan?s Island. This company was attached to no
regiment. The whole of the men at the Point was commanded by George Armstrong.?

?In July, he again entered the service as a substitute in the place of Thomas
Pendarvis for one month. This company was commanded by Captain Fullington. The
battalion was commanded by Major Charles ?Limming? He marched us from where we was stationed on the Point to Sullivan?s Island. We remained there ten days and returned to Hadrell?s Point and served out the term of one month.?

?In March 1779, he entered the service as a volunteer in Captain Thomas Dugan?s company, to range the Indian frontier. He remained in service until July. In March
1780, he again entered the service for 2 months; was drafted and added to Captain
Thomas Dugan?s company. His major?s name was Lewis Gillum and the colonel?s name was John Purvis. He was stationed at Cupboard Creek about two miles from Augusta,
Georgia.

?In the month of September of the year 1780, he entered the service as a volunteer
in Captain Thomas Dugan?s company, serving in said company until discharged. In July
1781, he was ordered out upon an expedition under Captain Levy Caisey, fell in with
General Sumter and was placed in the march as his rear guard. Tarleton coming upon
us, attacked our rear guard, killed and took a good many prisoners. He was, himself,
dangerously wounded and taken prisoner. Remained a prisoner until near Christmas
when he was paroled. As soon as his wounds would admit, he joined the army under
Captain James Dugan and was at the Siege of Ninety Six.?

?In the month of March following, he again entered the service for three months as a
substitute in the place of Alexander Dunlap. His captain?s name was Henry Key. The
colonel?s name was J. Smith. It was a company of horse, headquarters at Orangeburg,
and was marched to Ashapo. The whole detachment when united was commanded by Colonel Leroy Hammond. Our detachment joined the main army under General Greene while he lay with his army at Bacon?s Bridge on Ashley River, where his term of service expired and he was discharged.?

?In June 1782, he again entered the service as a volunteer for four months. This
company was commanded by Lieutenant James Stark (having no captain). While in
service in this company he was in an engagement with the Tories at John Richardson?s
Plantation upon Bush River, South Carolina. He served with no continental or regular
troops, but when on Sullivan?s Island and under General Greene?that he knows of no
person whose testimony he can procure (except his brother James Houston, whose
affidavit is hereunto annexed, also the affidavit of William Malone (who is now
dead), who can testify to his service.?

December the 16, 1825, Clark County, Georgia:
?I hereby certify that in the month of November 1780, I was a prisoner under Colonel
Tarleton on the day of the action at Blackstock?s on Tyger River, between General
Sumter and Colonel Tarleton in the state of South Carolina. Some time in the day,
Mr. John Houston was brought by some of Tarleton?s dragoons (or horsemen) and
delivered into the same guard that I was in, very badly wounded. He at that time was
a volunteer under the then Captain Levi Casey, then in defense of the American
cause. William Malone?

Coweta County, GA, August 23rd, 1833:
John Houston, aged 73 years-?That he entered the service in the army of the United States the 1st day of March 1776 for one month, as a substitute for his father who
was drafted, and served out his tour of one month and was discharged. His captain?s
name was Flood and his company was stationed in Charleston, South Carolina.?

?On the 1st day of June 1776, he again entered the service as a substitute for one
month in the place of Henry Coon, and served out his tour of duty and was
discharged. This company was commanded by Captain John Salley. This company was
stationed on the Lower Bridge between the Point (Hadrell?s) and Sullivan?s Island.
The day of the battle on Sullivan?s Island, this company was attached to no
regiment, but the whole of the men at Hadrell?s Point was under the command of
General Armstrong.?

?On the 3rd of July, 1776, he again entered the service as a substitute in the place
of Thomas Pendarvis for one month. This company was commanded by Captain Fullington,
the battalion commanded by Major Charles ?Lining? He marched us from where we were
stationed on the Point to Sullivan?s Island, where we remained ten days, thence to
Haddrell?s Point, where he served out the tour of one month and was discharged.?

?On the 5th of March, 1779, he entered the service as a volunteer in Captain Dugan?s
company for six months to range the Indian frontier, but remained in service only
four months, and was discharged in July of the same year.?

?On the 1st of March, 1780, he again entered the service for three months, was
drafted and added to Captain Thomas Dugan?s company. His major?s name was Levi
Gillum and the colonel, John Purvis. The company was stationed at Cupboard Creek,
two miles from Augusta, Georgia, and he there served his tour of duty of 3 months
and was discharged on the 3rd of June of the same year.?

?On the 10th of September, 1780, he entered the service as a volunteer in Captain
Thomas Dugan?s company for eighteen months; served in said company until the 15th
December, 1781, about 16 months, and was discharged. While in this service or
campaign, was ordered out upon an expedition under Captain Levi Caisey, fell in with
General Sumter?s detachment, and was placed on the march as his rear guard.
Tarleton, coming upon us, attacked our rear guard, killed and took many prisoners.
He, this deponent, himself was dangerously wounded and was taken prisoner. He
remained a prisoner until near Christmas, when he was paroled. As his wounds would
admit, he joined the army under Captain James Dugan and was at the Siege of Ninety
Six.?

?On the 1st day of March 1782, he entered the service 3 months as a substitute in
the place of Alexander Dunlap. His captain?s name was Henry Key, the colonel?s name
was Smith. This was a company of horse, headquarters at Orangeburg, South Carolina,
and was marched to Ashapo. The whole detachment, when united, was commanded by
Colonel Leroy Hammond. Our detachment joined the main army under General Greene,
while he lay with his army at Bacon?s Bridge on Ashley River, until his term of
service of 3 months expired and he was discharged.?

?On the 6th of June, 1782, he again entered the service as a volunteer for four
months. This company was commanded by Lieutenant James Stark (having no captain).
While in service in this company, he was in an engagement with the Tories at John
Richardson?s Plantation on Bush River, South Carolina. He served out his tour and
was discharged??

Coweta County, GA, 15th November, 1833:
?He was living in Orangeburg District in the state of SC when his father was
drafted to serve a tour of one month for the protection of Charleston. He entered in
the month on March in the year 1776, as a substitute for him and served out the
tour??

?In the month of June of the same year, he again entered the service as a
substitute for Henry Coon, to serve a tour of one month, rendezvous at the city of
Charleston. He was under the command John Salley. About the first of the month,
sailed from Charleston in company with the Charleston Grenadiers and Foresters to
Hadrell?s Point. The Charleston Grenadiers were commanded by Captain ___ McCall [or
maybe McCaul], the Foresters by Captain ____ ?Lazing? On the day of the battle at
Sullivan?s Island, his company was placed as a guard at the Lower Bridge between the
Point and the Island. The day of the battle, his company was not attached to any
regiment. The whole of the men at the point was commanded by General ___
Armstrong.?

?At the expiration of this tour, which was about the first July, he was discharged
and immediately entered the service again for the term of one month as a substitute
for Thomas Pendarvis. He was commanded by Captain Fullington, his battalion by Major
Charles Livingston. He marched us from the Point to Sullivan?s Island and remained
there ten days, thence back to Hadrell?s Point at which place he remained in actual
service until his time of service expired, which was about the first of August, when
he was discharged.?

In the month of January in the year of 1779, he removed from Orangeburg to Ninety Sixth District, SC and settled in Colonel James Williams? regiment. About the first
of March of the year 1779, he entered the service as a volunteer under Captain
Thomas Dugan, rendezvous two miles above the Tumbling Shoals on Reedy River, then on the Indian line, at which station he remained in actual service till sometime of the
month of July, when he was discharged.?

?In the month of February or March of the year 1780 he was drafted and added to Captain Thomas Dugan?s company, rendezvous at a place called Chalk Hills in South Carolina near Augusta, GA. The battalion was commanded by Major Lewis Gillum. We remained at this place two or three weeks when we were marched across the Savannah River to Cupboard Creek near Augusta, GA and we fell in with other troops, at which place we remained till our term of service expired, which was three months. At
Cupboard Creek the whole of the troops were under the command of Colonel John
Purvis.?

?In the fall of the year 1780 (the month not now recollected), he turned out as a volunteer under Captain Thomas Dugan with fixed resolution to retake his country
____. He immediately thereafter joined General Sumter and the troops under his
command at Indian ___ now in Newberry District. We were marched to Broad River, the
whole under the command of General Sumter and down said river to Shira?s Ferry at
which place we had a small skirmish with the British across the river. From thence
we were marched back again to Dunkin?s Creek. Immediately upon our arrival at this
place, we were informed of the approach of Tarleton and his troops. By order of
General Sumter, Captain Levi Caisey chose twelve men of the main body of the army to
rencontre, of which twelve he was one of the number thus chosen. On our excursion
that night we fell in with three Tories and took them prisoners. The next morning
whilst we were endeavoring to return to the main army, we were observed and
overtaken by Tarleton and his legion at a place then called Cross Roads, between
Dunkin Creek and Enoree River.?

?In this skirmish he was dangerously wounded and taken prisoner and carried to Blackstock, at which place he remained about a week; then placed in the hands of
Major McCarthy and his battalion, taken by them to Sherrill?s Ferry on Broad River,
at which place he remained about ten days; from thence removed to the widow ____
Woodward on Little River where Tarleton and his legion lay,; at which place he
remained about two weeks, when he was removed to Winnsborough (Cornwallis?
headquarters). At this place he remained a few days, when he was paroled. He
returned home to his father?s where he remained a short time, till General Greene
came on with his army.?

?He then broke his parole and joined the troops under General Greene, was attached
to the company commanded by his old captain Thomas Dugan, and remained with him
until the siege of Ninety Six was raised, at which time Captain Thomas Dugan
resigned. His brother James Dugan took the command of the company. They retreated
with the main army to ?Hemillons? on Tyger River, at which place his captain and his
company left the main army to scour the country of Tories; remained under him till
he was killed by the Tories; after which this company was commanded by Captain John
Virgin and Lieutenant James Stark. The whole of the troops under the command of
Colonel Joseph Hayes.?

?Rendezvoused at Carr?s [?Kerr?s?] Mills, Bush River, thence to a place called Dutch
Fork. Then fell in with Captain Philemon Waters and his company of state troops,
thence marched in company with him and his forces to Faust?s Ford on Broad River,
then down to Ancrum Big House on the Congaree River. There we remained till Greene?s
army marched from the High Hills of Santee near us, when we furnished them with some
beef cattle.?

?About this time, our colonel was informed that the Tories were numerous in our part
of the country, which caused him to return, after which we were closely employed two
or three weeks in driving the Tories off (about which time the Battle of the Eutaw
Springs was fought). Shortly thereafter, Governor Rutledge issued his proclamation
for removing of the wives and children of the Tories to the city lines, in which
occupation Colonel Hayes and his forces, to which he himself attached, were engaged
five or six weeks, after which the Tories attacked Colonel Hayes and his company,
and being too strong for him, overpowered and murdered him, together with seventeen
of his men in cold blood after he had surrendered to them. At the time of this
engagement he was sent off into his own settlement by order of his colonel.?

?After the murder of Colonel Hayes, Colonel Levi Caisey commanded the regiment,
rendezvous, the house of John Cunningham, where he was placed under the command of
Lieutenant Arthur McCracken together with five other men to guard the Tories and
make them break hemp to send to Petersburg, Virginia to purchase salt, at which time
the legislature convened at Jacksonboro, SC, where all the volunteers were
discharged, he thinks in the latter part of December 1781.?

?In the month of March of the year following, he again entered the service for three
months in a company of horse as a substitute in the place of Alexander Dunlap. His
captain?s name was Henry Key, his colonel?s name was Jared Smith, who commanded the
regiment (headquarters were at Orangeburg) and the whole under the command of Leroy Hammond. Our detachment joined the main army under General Greene while he lay with his main army at Bacon?s Bridge on Ashley River, at which place he remained a short time when his term of service expired, when he was discharged.?

?In June 1782, he again entered the service as a volunteer for a tour of four
months. This company was commanded by Lieutenant James Stark, having no captain
while in service in this company. He was in an engagement with the Tories at John
Richardson?s Plantation on Bush River, SC. This company of Tories was commanded by
William Cunningham, the noted Tory. And the deponent saith that the following
contains the periods he served, all of which he served as a private for which he now
claims a pension:

March 1776-1 month under Captain Flood, substitute.

June 1776-1 ditto under Captain Salley, ditto.

July 1776-1 ditto under Captain Fullington, ditto.

March till July 1779-4 ditto, volunteered under Captain Dugan.

July 1780-3 ditto, drafted, Captain Dugan

Fall 1780 to Dec. 1781-He was not less than 12 months actual service that he
actually received pay for the whole of the term, and that during this time he served
under such officers as set forth in the foregoing.

March till June 1782-3 months as a substitute under Captain Henry Key.

June till October 1782-4 months volunteer under Lieutenant Stark.

Coweta County, GA, March 1st, 1834:
?John Houston, who being duly sworn, deposeth and saith that he did serve as stated in his amended declaration, as is returned unsatisfactory, twelve months constant service (to wit, from November 1780 to December 1781) as follows: That he entered the service in November 1780 in Captain Dugan?s company as a volunteer for no
settled period, but to serve as circumstances might require.?

?That in ten days after this deponent had joined his company, he was in a battle
with the British under the command of Tarleton. That this deponent was dangerously
wounded and taken prisoner and retained in close confinement for six weeks, and was
then liberated on parole until exchanged, and remained under parole about six weeks
more. Having recovered from his wounds, he broke his parole by joining the army
under General Greene in the early part of the year 1781, in Captain Dugan?s company
and served three months under General Greene at the Siege of Ninety Six.?

?Immediately after the siege, this deponent rendezvoused at Carr?s Mills on Bush River and remained in this service or tour about one month, and returned back to his regiment under the command of Colonel Joseph Hays. Colonel Hays received orders from Governor Rutledge immediately after this deponent had joined the regiment, to remove all the women and children of the Tories out of the limits of his command over to
the British, which service we were about two months in performing. The balance of
the year, for self preservation, we were compelled to remain in service and under
arms to keep from being butchered up by the Tories foe they killed every Whig they
could get hold of??
File at: http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ga/coweta/military/revw
ar/pensions/houston266gmt.txt
Thi s file has been created by a form at http://www.genrecords.org/gafiles/
File size: 17.9 Kb

John Houston (often called Jr. but not during his life) was born April 10, 1760 in Ireland, according to his pension records. The names of his parents were not mentioned in the records, but descendants state they were John and Mary Ross Houston. The name Ross is used for descendants of both families.

He enlisted in the Revolutionary War on March 01, 1776 from Orangeburg District, South Carolina, in place of his father, in Captain Flood's Company. From June 01, 1776 one month in Captain John Sally's company and from July 03, 1776 one month in Captain Fullington's company, under Major Charles Limming. He moved to Ninety Six District late in 1779 and served several more tours of duty up through 1782, serving as a private. During that time he served as follows; from Mary 05, 1779, four months in Captain Thomas Dugan's company to range on the frontier; from March 01, 1780, three months in Captain Dugan's company, Colonel John Purvis' regiment; from in the fall of 1780 until December 15, 1781 under Captains Thomas and James Dugan and John Virgin, Colonels Joseph Hays and Levi Gaisey; from March 01, 1782, three months in Captain Henry Keys' company, under Colonel Jared Smith; from June 06, 1782, four months under Lieutenant James Stark. During his service he was in skirmishes on broad River and was wounded at Cross Roads between Demkins Creek and Encore Rover. Taken prisoner, remained until Christmas, released on parole, broke parole and re-enlisted. He was at the seige of Ninety-Six and an engagement at Bush River.

He married in the summer of 1788, Mary Wilson. She was still living in 1843. She was allowed pension on her application executed November, 1835 at which time she was seventy-five years of age. It is known that in 1836 she received $80.00 per annum pension.

About 1801 he moved to Jasper County, Georgia, and by 1827 he is found in the tax records of Fayette County, Georgia. In 1833, he is living in Coweta County, Georgia where by sworn statement he made application on November 15 for his pension. He died May 24, 1835 and his will is of record, being dated March 17, 1834 and recorded July 06, 1835, Coweta County, Georgia.

I John Houston of the County of Coweta and State of Georgia being at this time of a very advanced age and at this time much afflicted with bodily infirmities and well Knowing the mortality of Man that we are sooner or later to die and being of sound mind and memory blessed be God. Have concluded to dispose of my wordly goods which it has pleased God to bestow on my in the following manner, viz

Item the 1st I give unto my wife Mary Houston to her and her heirs for ever the East half of lot of land on which I now reside being lot no. 143 in Second District Coweta also three negros viz Prissy, Jacob and Siller to her and her use for ever I also give to my wife Mary Houston one black mare and colt three choice cows thirty head of hogs ten head of Sheep house hold and kitchen furniture &tc.

Item 2nd I give and bequeath unto my son Hugh W. Houston one lot of land lying in the county of Carroll no. 201 Sixth District said county to him & his heirs for ever I also give and bequeath unto my son Hugh W. Houston one Black mare two years old to him and his heirs forever &tc.

Item 3rd I give and bequeath unto my grand son John Houston one Sorrel mare two years old to him and his heirs for ever

Item 4th My desire is that 2 1/2 lots land no. 146 144 and half lot no. 143 in the Second district Coweta County be divided according to quantity and quality between my sons Oliver Houston Samuel Houston John Houston Hugh W. Houston and my grandson James Houston

Item 5th I desire that my Negroes Thebe, Wesly, Joe, Hartwell, Scott, Edmund, Adaline, Suesa, Gra ...

... my son in law James G. Stewart and my grandson James Houston

Item 6th I desire that one Sorrel mare 30 head cattle 20 head sheep all my money and crop be equally divided between my sons Oliver Samuel John Hugh W. Houston and my son in law James G. Stewart to them and their heirs forever.

Item 7th I desire that I may at death be buried in a decent manner without great expense and that my sons Samuel Houston & John Houston before named who has been an obedient & faithful children to me shall be and is here by of me appointed my Executors to carry into effect this my last will & testament ratifying and confirming the same here by in Testimony where of I have here unto set my hand and affirmed by Seal this 17th day March 1834 John Houston

wit: Joseph Bohannon, William Watkins, John Edwards



Memo: 3 generations

Notes for Mary Wilson:

also described as Mary Hughey.

Children of John Houston and Mary Wilson are:

+ 2 i. Oliver2 Houston, born 1788 in Coweta Co., GA; died 1853 in Coweta Co., GA.

3 ii. Elizabeth Houston, born Abt. 1797; died 18 Sep 1850 in Coweta Co., GA. She married James G. Stewart 27 Jan 1829 in Fayette Co., GA.

+ 4 iii. Samuel H. Houston, born 03 Nov 1789 in SC; died 05 Sep 1850 in Newnan, Coweta Co., GA.

+ 5 iv. John Houston III, born Abt. 1793 in Newberry Dist., SC; died 1851 in Coweta Co., GA.

6 v. Hugh W. Houston, born 1791 in SC; died 1839 in on Sandy Creek, by lightning.

Notes for Hugh W. Houston:

served during Florida and Creek Wars

7 vi. Mary Houston, born Abt. 1795 in SC. She married Elijah Dennis 12 Dec 1848 in Coweta Co., GA.



Generation No. 2

2. Oliver2 Houston (John1) was born 1788 in Coweta Co., GA, and died 1853 in Coweta Co., GA. He married (1) Cynthia Flournoy 18 May 1815 in Jasper Co., GA. She was born 1795 in of Jasper Co., GA, and died Bet. 1833 - 1840. He married (2) Martha Ann Adams 18 Sep 1840 in Coweta Co., GA. She was born 1817 in of Coweta Co., GA.

Notes for Oliver Houston:

or Oliver Huston

Children of Oliver Houston and Cynthia Flournoy are:

+ 8 i. James B.3 Houston, born 08 Oct 1812 in GA; died 09 Oct 1864 in Franklin, CSA, Heard, GA.

+ 9 ii. John Houston, born 1816 in Jasper Co., GA.

+ 10 iii. David R. Houston, born 1821 in Jasper Co., GA.

+ 11 iv. Frances Houston, born Abt. 1823.

12 v. Mary Ann Houston, born 21 May 1823; died 13 Nov 1894 in Coweta Co., GA.

+ 13 vi. William H. Houston, born 30 Mar 1828 in GA; died 13 Mar 1912 in Whitesburg, Carroll, GA.

+ 14 vii. Oliver Ross Houston, born Abt. 1831 in Coweta Co., GA.

15 viii. Cynthia Ann Houston, born Bef. 1832. She married James Sandford 02 Sep 1848 in Coweta Co., GA.

16 ix. Sarah Houston, born 1833 in Coweta Co., GA. She married William Chambers.

Children of Oliver Houston and Martha Adams are:

+ 17 i. Joseph Cincinnati3 Houston, born 02 Jun 1843 in Newnan, GA; died 28 Dec 1917 in Stanton, AL.

18 ii. Newton B. Houston, born 14 Jul 1845. He married Susan C. Moore 09 Jan 1890 in Coweta Co., GA.

+ 19 iii. Emma C. Houston, born 1848; died 09 May 1910. 
Houston, John Jr. (I0170)
 
44 Born June 1, 1832, died Sept. 20, 1911 (recorded in the family Bible)
Aunt Lit said she was born in Harris County, Georgia in a place called King's Gap at the foot of Pine Mountain. 
Barker, Sarah Elizabeth (I0023)
 
45 Buried at Bethamy Cemetery, New Brockton, AL
[Rob12.FTW]

Buried at Bethamy Cemetery, New Brockton, AL 
Robertson, Howell Foreman (I4726)
 
46 Buried at Bethany Cemetery, New Brockton, AL
[Rob12.FTW]

Buried at Bethany Cemetery, New Brockton, AL 
McDowell, Lilla Corene (I4727)
 
47 Buried at Bethany Cemetery, New Brockton, AL
[Rob12.FTW]

Buried at Bethany Cemetery, New Brockton, AL 
Robertson, Wilson William (I4728)
 
48 Buried at Bethlehem Methodist Church Cemetery, Munford, Talledega County, AL
Located on Hwy 468, McElderry Road, 2 miles from McElderry Station Community. 
Grogan, James Wiley (I0546)
 
49 Buried at Oak Grove Cemetery, Brunswick, Ga Houston, Tallulah Lee (I1246)
 
50 Buried at Oakwood Cemetery[Rob12.FTW]

Buried at Oakwood Cemetery 
Duncan, Willie Gordon (I0040)
 

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